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  • Full Mulvaney: 'Washington Won' On GOP Health Bill FalloutIn an exclusive interview on Meet the Press, Budget Director Mick Mulvaney talked to Chuck Todd about Pres. Trump’s efforts on the GOP healthcare bill after the decision to pull it before the vote.


    Pentagon: An al-Qaida leader killed in Afghanistan airstrikeWASHINGTON (AP) — A U.S. counterterrorism airstrike earlier this month in Afghanistan killed an al-Qaida leader responsible for a deadly hotel attack in Islamabad in 2008 and the 2009 attack on a bus carrying the Sri Lankan cricket team, the Pentagon said Saturday.


    Officer is Found Guilty in Shooting Death of 6-Year-Old Boy With AutismJeremy Mardis was shot to death while in his dad's car in 2015.


    Pentagon Opens Investigation Into Whether U.S. Airstrikes Killed 200 Civilians in MosulSenior military and defense officials are investigating reports that scores of civilians — potentially nearly 200 — were killed in a U.S. airstrike in the Iraqi city of Mosul last week.


    Infowars apologizes for spreading 'Pizzagate' theory. What does that mean for fake news?Infowars owner and long-time conspiracy theorist Alex Jones admitted that his site falsely reported and commented on the debunked “Pizzagate” controversy, a theory that alleged that Comet Ping Pong, a Washington, D.C., pizza restaurant, had played a role in a child-sex-trafficking ring that also involved Hillary Clinton. Apologizing to the restaurant’s owner, James Alefantis, Mr. Jones issued a statement Friday. “I want our viewers and listeners to know that we regret any negative impact our commentaries may have had on Mr. Alefantis, Comet Ping Pong, or its employees,” he said.


    North Korea's Latest Nuclear Test?Satellite images of North Korea's nuclear test site showed significant changes, according to a report that cited U.S. officials.


    Lebanon university settles US lawsuit over HezbollahA Lebanese university will pay $700,000 to settle a US lawsuit over allegations it provided "material support" to entities linked to Hezbollah, US officials said. The American University of Beirut confirmed in a statement Friday it was settling the lawsuit, which charged it had violated the terms of grants it received from US Agency for International Development (USAID). The US Attorney's Office in Manhattan announced the deal on Thursday, saying AUB would be required to pay the US government $700,000 (650,000 euros) and revise its internal policies to ensure future compliance with US law.


    Venezuela's Maduro asks U.N. to help ease medicine shortagesVenezuelan President Nicolas Maduro said on Friday he has asked the United Nations to help the South American nation alleviate medicine shortages, which have become increasingly severe as the oil-producing nation's economic crisis accelerates. Maduro did not specify the type of aid he requested, although he stressed that the U.N. has knowledge of the pharmaceutical industry. Maduro earlier on Friday met with Jessica Faieta, Assistant Administrator and Director of the U.N. Development Program, according to state television.


    Former Penn State President Found Guilty of Child EndangermentThe university’s former president Graham Spanier was convicted Friday on a misdemeanor count of child endangerment. The charges came five years after former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky was convicted of sexually abusing young boys.


    Uber grounds self-driving cars after accidentUber has grounded its fleet of self-driving cars pending an investigation into the crash of an Uber autonomous vehicle in Arizona, a spokesperson for the car-hailing service said Sunday. No one was seriously injured in the accident which occurred Friday in Tempe, Arizona while the vehicle -- a Volvo SUV -- was in self-driving mode, the company said. "We are continuing to look into this incident and can confirm we had no backseat passengers in the vehicle," the Uber spokesperson said.


    Ex-CIA chief: Flynn's firm discussed removing cleric from USWASHINGTON (AP) — Former CIA Director James Woolsey has accused the Trump administration's former national security adviser, Michael Flynn, of participating in a discussion with Turkish officials about possibly subverting the U.S. extradition process to remove a Turkish cleric from the United States.


    UK police still believe London attacker was acting aloneBritish anti-terrorism police said on Saturday they still believe the man who launched a deadly attack outside parliament this week was acting alone but conceded they may never understand his motive. British-born Islamic convert Khalid Masood, 52, was shot dead after killing four people including a policemen in a rampage on Wednesday when he rammed his car into pedestrians and tried to force his way into the parliament building in central London. Islamic State claimed responsibility for the attack and police inquiries since have concentrated on whether Masood was acting with accomplices.


    Woman Stunned to Get Her Stolen Wallet Back 8 Years Later... With $141 Still InsideIncredibly, Courtney Connolly desperately needed $140 to enter a competition this summer.


    Dialysis supplies dwindle for besieged SyriansDania, 14, was writhing in pain ahead of her first ever dialysis session. Renal insufficiency limits the kidney's ability to filter waste out of the bloodstream or regulate hormones, and is typically treated with several dialysis sessions per week.


    Erdogan's tussle with Europe, The shame of the world, Regional support for Venezuela is vital, Scotland's place in the United Kingdom, US reengagement in the Middle East“It is a matter of grave concern that, according to a UN estimate, twenty million people are facing starvation in Yemen, South Sudan, Somalia and Nigeria...," states an editorial. "It is indeed disturbing to note that man-made disasters like war and famine continue to bleed nations while international politics fails to come to a consensus on how to reach a stasis in parts of the Middle East, Northeast Nigeria and vast swathes of Somalia.... We urge the international community to infuse immediate aid to these four war-torn and famine ravaged countries.... It is indeed appalling that in this era of globalisation and scientific breakthroughs, fellow human beings should die of hunger.... The shame is on us all.


    This Week Fast Forward 03.26.2017Speed through the highlights from the latest "This Week."


    Protests nationwide bring thousands to Russia's streetsRussia’s opposition, often written off by critics as a small and irrelevant coterie of privileged urbanites, put on an impressive nationwide show of strength Sunday with scores of protest rallies spanning the vast country. Hundreds were arrested, including Alexei Navalny, the anti-corruption campaigner who is President Vladimir Putin’s most prominent critic.


    'Prove you are leaders of Europe,' Tusk tells Rome summitEU President Donald Tusk called for leadership to steer Europe out of crisis at a special summit in Rome on Saturday to mark the 60th anniversary of the bloc's founding treaties. "Prove today that you are the leaders of Europe, that you can care for this great legacy we inherited from the heroes of European integration 60 years ago," former Polish prime minister Tusk said in a speech. Twenty-seven leaders are meeting without British Prime Minister Theresa May to celebrate the signing of the European Union's founding Treaty of Rome on March 25, 1957.


    Weary flyers shrug as Middle East laptop ban takes offA controversial ban on carry-on laptops and tablets on flights from the Middle East to the United States and Britain went into effect Saturday -- with less fanfare and frustration than expected. At Dubai International, one of the world's busiest hubs, flag carrier Emirates dispatched staff to guide passengers through one of the most intense travel weekends of the year.


    Congo must help search for missing UN experts: Rights groupDAKAR, Senegal (AP) — Congo's government must cooperate with United Nations efforts to locate experts who have been missing in the violent Kasai region for nearly two weeks, Human Rights Watch said Saturday.


    Egypt sentences 56 in migrant boat disaster case to prisonCAIRO (AP) — An Egyptian court sentenced 56 defendants Sunday in the case of a boat carrying migrants that capsized off the coastal city of Rosetta in September, killing more than 200 people.


    Syrian opposition 'fed up with terrorists', seeks help against AssadBy Tom Miles GENEVA (Reuters) - The Syrian opposition rejects terrorism and is "fed up" with banned militants but they cannot be stopped if Syria continues evicting populations of besieged areas, opposition negotiator Basma Kodmani said on Sunday. Syria's government has always cited the fight against terrorism to justify its part in a six-year war that has killed hundreds of thousands, and brands all its opponents and their backers as terrorists and sponsors of terror. The opposition's chief negotiator Nasr al-Hariri, who is trying to negotiate an end the rule of President Bashar al-Assad, began this month by saying its stance against terrorism was proven on the battlefield and not mere words.


    VIDEO: Local professor weighs in on GOP health care bill falloutAction News spoke with Professor Randall Miller from St. Joe's University Friday night, regarding his take on how damaging the death of the GOP health care plan is to President Trump's ability to get the rest of his to-do list accomplished.


    Photos of the day - March 25, 2017A woman dressed as “Europa" performs during a rally in Berlin marking the 60th anniversary of the Treaty of Rome; a woman, pushed to the ground by police, tries to defends herself as the police detain an activist during an opposition rally in Minsk, Belarus; Pope Francis waves to the faithful from the Popemobile in Milan, Italy, as Cardinal Angelo Scola, the archbishop of Milan, looks on, after the Angelus in Duomo Square. These are some of the photos of the day. (AP/EPA/Getty/Reuters)


    Malaysia Could Soon Analyze Its Own Black BoxesDeputy Transport Minister Datuk Ab Aziz Kaprawi announced Thursday that Malaysia intended to create a laboratory with the capability to analyze flight recorders.


    Corroded South Korean ferry loaded onto transport vesselSEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Salvage crews towed a corroded 6,800-ton South Korean ferry and loaded it onto a semi-submersible transport vessel Saturday, completing what was seen as the most difficult part of the massive effort to bring the ship back to shore nearly three years after it sank.


    Troubled EU renews vows on 60th anniversaryEuropean Union leaders renewed their vows at a special summit in Rome on Saturday, celebrating the troubled bloc's 60th anniversary with a commitment to a common future without Britain. With British Prime Minister Theresa May absent, the other 27 countries signed a new declaration on the Capitoline Hill where six founding states signed the Treaty of Rome on March 25, 1957. Pro- and anti-EU protests took place in Rome, while in London tens of thousands of people marched against Brexit, which May will trigger on Wednesday.


    Watch the US Navy test its ultra-powerful electromagnetic railgun

    Anyone who's played a futuristic shooter since the dawn of video games knows that when you see something called a "railgun" you're in for a real treat. Well, the US Navy built a railgun of its very own, and it just showed off its remarkably powerful creation in a new video of its test firing.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=106&v=Pi-BDIu_umo

    Railguns like the one the Navy has built trade chemical propellants like gunpowder for the sheer power of electricity, generating extremely strong magnetic fields to push a projectile down a set of rails and out the end of the barrel. It might not sound particularly efficient, but the speeds that railgun projectiles can achieve put traditional cannons to shame. The Navy's massive weapon, for example, launches its rounds at a whopping 4,500 mph.

    Additionally, the projectiles launched by the railgun do their damage not by exploding, but simply by striking their target while moving at such a high speed, quite literally tearing apart anything they come into contact with.

    For most of their history, railguns have been more fiction than science, and their practicality and reliability has repeatedly been questioned over time. The size of the device itself is typically massive, owing to the large and complex electronic components required to supply the necessary power. However, there are also some pretty fantastic benefits of the non-explosive rounds, such as much less chance of unexploded ordnance causing problems either on the ship or vehicle firing the weapon, or on the battlefield after a skirmish has ended.


    Pro-Houthi court sentences Yemen president to death for treasonA Yemeni court in territory controlled by the armed Houthi movement sentenced the group's enemy in a two-year-old civil war President Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi and six other top officials in his government to death for "high treason" on Saturday. Saudi Arabia and a mostly Gulf Arab military coalition have launched thousands of air strikes and a small number of ground troops to try to dislodge the Houthis and restore Hadi to power. The Houthis, allied to Saudi Arabia's arch-enemy Iran, have progressively lost territory to the offensive but maintain control over the capital and most population centers.


    3 dead, 1 injured in Mexico prison riotMEXICO CITY (AP) — A fight between inmates at a northern Mexican prison left three inmates dead and one injured, authorities said Saturday.


    Pentagon Weighs More Support for Saudi-led War in YemenAs the administration debates how to confront Iran, some in the Pentagon favor ratcheting up support for Saudi Arabia’s campaign against Tehran-backed Houthi rebels.


    New York skyscrapers adapt to climate changeWith a skyline crowded with ever-more luxury towers, the construction of another Manhattan skyscraper wouldn't normally be remarkable. Planned just after deadly Hurricane Sandy ravaged New York in October 2012 -- sounding another alarm about the mounting effects of climate change -- it was designed with new threats in mind, reflecting how the real estate world is evolving to account for global warming, in contrast to President Donald Trump's moves to roll back environmental protection. The huge storm killed more than 40 people in New York, paralyzing the US financial capital for days.


    Double-amputee Marine vet joins New York police departmentBRENTWOOD, N.Y. (AP) — The wounded warrior is now a cop — and he'll be walking the beat on titanium legs.


    April The Giraffe Defying The OddsThe pregnant was expected to go into labor weeks ago, but is yet to show signs of active labor.


    Vietnamese detainee dies in Japan's immigration center: sourcesBy Minami Funakoshi TOKYO (Reuters) - A Vietnamese man held in a Japanese immigration detention center died on Saturday, six people told Reuters, drawing fresh attention to conditions in the country's detention system. The man died at the East Japan Immigration Center in Ibaraki prefecture, northeast of Tokyo, according to activists, a lawyer and a detainee held at the facility. The deceased man was named Van Huan Nguyen and was one of more than 11,000 refugees that the country took in over the three decades to 2005 in the aftermath of the Vietnam War, according to two of the sources.


    Violence erupts at pro-Trump rally on California beachSupporters of President Trump holding a rally on a popular Southern California beach clashed with counter-protesters on Saturday and four people were arrested, law enforcement said. Multiple fights broke out and at least one Trump supporter was doused with pepper spray when pro-Trump demonstrators marching along Bolsa Chica State Beach encountered a small group opposed to the Republican president who had gathered to denounce the rally. Four counter-protesters were arrested, three for illegal use of pepper spray and one for assault and battery, Kevin Pearsall, a spokesman for the California State Parks Police said on Saturday evening.


    Angry over U.S. healthcare fail, Trump voters spare him blameThe day after the flaming out of U.S. President Donald Trump's first major legislative initiative, his supporters across America were lashing out - at conservatives, at Democrats, at leaders of his Republican Party in Congress. "Being a businessman, he'll not take 'no' for an answer," said Tony Nappi, a 71-year-old from Trinity, Florida, one of the many disappointed Republicans on his weekend softball team. Support for Trump appeared unflagging, from the playing fields of a Republican stronghold in central Florida to the small town diners of North Carolina, the suburbs of Arkansas and the streets of working-class Staten Island in New York City.


    Man who bound dog's muzzle with tape sentenced to 5 yearsCHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) — A South Carolina man who wrapped electrical tape around a dog's muzzle to stop her from barking has been sentenced to five years in prison.


    Rebel supporters flood Yemen streets on conflict anniversaryHundreds of thousands of people demonstrated in Yemen's rebel-held capital on Sunday in a show of support for the insurgents, two years after a Gulf coalition intervened against the rebels. The Iran-backed Huthi rebels staged a show of force over the weekend with the mass rally in Sanaa and a symbolic court ruling against Yemen's embattled president, whose troops are supported by the Saudi-led Gulf coalition. Crowds converged on Sabeen Square in Sanaa, raising banners in protest against the Saudi-led intervention and chanting a vow to "resist to the end".


    Five months later, Samsung is finally about to kill every remaining Note 7 phone

    When it was released last fall, Samsung's Galaxy Note 7 was the hottest Android phone the world had ever seen. Unfortunately though, the Galaxy Note 7 was literally the hottest Android phone the world had ever seen. A poor battery design caused dozens of phones to explode while being charged — and in some cases, while unplugged and in use — causing property damage and even injuring some users in the process. As a result, Samsung was forced to issue an unprecedented global recall, asking everyone around the world who purchased the phone to return or exchange it as soon as possible.

    Most of the potentially destructive smartphones have been collected by now. Since the phone was so impressive, however, a small percentage of holdouts have refused to give up their precious Note 7 handsets. We're not sure why Samsung waited as long as it did, but the company is finally taking its final step in ensuring that the Note 7 cannot do anymore damage.

    According to South Korean news site Yonhap News, Samsung will take steps next week to completely disable any remaining Galaxy Note 7 smartphones that may still be in use. The company said some time ago that 97% of all Note 7 phones have been reclaimed by the company. With more than 1 million handsets sold before Samsung discontinued the phone, however, that leaves tens of thousands of Note 7 handsets still in users' hands.

    According to the report, Samsung plans to issue a mandatory software update that will completely prevent any remaining Galaxy Note 7 devices from holding a charge. As a result, the phones will no longer be able to power on unless they are plugged in. Samsung and its carrier partners issued a similar software update in the US late last year and in early 2017, and now any remaining markets where the Note 7 might still be in use will get the update.

    Diehard Samsung fans who were holding onto their Note 7 phones won't have to wait very long before their soon-to-be crippled Note 7 phones are replaced. Samsung will unveil its new Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ flagship phones on Wednesday, and they'll be released about a month later.


    'Still one of us': 92-year-old gets Purple Heart from WWIIFAYETTEVILLE, N.C. (AP) — A 92-year-old North Carolina man has finally received the Purple Heart he earned more than 70 years ago while fighting in Belgium during World War II.


    Cities and monuments switch off for Earth HourThe Empire State Building and United Nations headquarters in New York joined other iconic buildings and monuments around the world plunging into darkness for sixty minutes on Saturday to mark Earth Hour and draw attention to climate change. The Eiffel Tower, the Kremlin, the Acropolis in Athens and Sydney's Opera House also dimmed their lights as millions of people from some 170 countries and territories were expected to take part in Earth Hour, the annual bid to highlight global warming caused by the burning of coal, oil and gas to drive cars and power plants.


    Major nations responsible for keeping world peace: China vice premierThe world's major nations are responsible for maintaining global peace, and all countries should remain committed to a road of stable and peaceful development, China's Vice Premier Zhang Gaoli said on Saturday. Earlier this month, Pyongyang launched four ballistic missiles in response to joint U.S.-South Korea military exercises, which it regards as preparation to war. "Large countries have the responsibility to maintain global peace, should increase strategic dialogue, increase mutual trust, and respect each other's core interests and major concerns," Zhang said at the opening of the Boao Forum for Asia in southern China's Hainan province.


    Tesla’s Model 3 dashboard won’t be as futuristic as we hoped

    This past Friday, Tesla CEO Elon Musk dashed the hopes and dreams of prospective Model 3 owners with just a few simple tweets. Tempering expectations, Musk emphasized that Tesla's upcoming Model 3 will not be more advanced -- in any capacity -- than the company's flagship Model S.

    "Model 3 is just a smaller, more affordable version of Model S [with] less range & power & fewer features," Musk said. "Model S has more advanced technology." Musk later added that the Model 3 will not feature the elegant "auto extend handles" Tesla introduced on the Model S.

    While Muks's comments here might seem obvious, the reality is that some of the hype and speculation surrounding the Model 3 had reached bizarre levels in recent months. Case in point: because the Model 3 prototype Tesla unveiled last year lacked an instrument panel with traditional gauges for items like speed, range and other pertinent information, many Tesla enthusiasts began wondering if Tesla had some special plan for the dashboard, with many believing that a heads up display (HUD) on the windshield was an inevitability.

    As a quick reminder, here's a photo of the Model 3 interior taken from the company's special event last year. As is evident below, the only location a driver can access information is the 15-inch touchscreen in the center console.

    In another shot, we can see that Model 3 drivers will have to divert their eyes to the upper left hand corner of the display in order to ascertain their current speed.

    Alas, Tesla doesn't have any secret plans to implement some advanced HUD on the Model 3. In a tweet addressing the matter, Musk said that as cars become more autonomous, the need for a suite of information at the ready becomes less of an issue.

    https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/845285846936825856

    Still, we're still a long ways off before fully self driving cars become commonplace. In turn, it remains to be seen if the Model 3 design in its current incarnation is perhaps too far ahead of its time. Besides, autonomous driving features for the Model 3 will cost extra, meaning that not every Model 3 on the road will be able to take advantage of the vehicle's self-driving capabilities.

    One question about the Model 3 that remains unanswered is whether or not can expect any changes to the car's steering wheel design. This past April, Musk boasted that the final design will be akin to a spaceship.

    https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/716729420078133248

    To answer that, we'll probably have to wait until next July when Tesla is planning the next phase of its Model 3 reveal.


    Pope in Milan region to rally for those in needPope Francis went to Milan on Saturday where he met families on a working-class housing estate and visited a prison before celebrating mass for hundreds of thousands of faithful in nearby Monza. During his visit to Milan, better known for football, fashion and luxury, the Argentine pontiff put the spotlight on those less fortunate. Francis's first stop was at the Case Bianche (White Houses), a run-down collection of concrete tower blocks from the 1970s on the edge of the wealthy city.


    Readers write: Immigration path, talent at home, science knowledgeRegarding the Feb. 22 editorial, “Trump’s mixed message on immigration: An opening for a deal?” (CSMonitor.com): Three cheers for the Monitor editorial staff. Immigration was not my priority issue. Recommended: Could you pass a US citizenship test?


    Congolese militia decapitates more than 40 police: OfficialsBENI, Congo (AP) — A Congolese militia group has decapitated 42 policemen after ambushing them in an increasingly violent region where the U.N. is searching for missing American and Swedish investigators, a local official said Saturday.


    Two charged over supplying gun to French airport attackerFrench anti-terrorism judges have charged two men suspected of involvement in supplying a weapon to the gunman killed at Paris's Orly airport after attacking soldiers, a judicial source said Saturday. The suspects, aged 30 and 43, were charged Friday for "association with terrorist criminals" over the March 18 incident, the latest in France which remains on a state of emergency after a series of deadly jihadist attacks. The 30-year-old detained Friday is suspected of having given Ben Belgacem a revolver a few days before the attack, while the older suspect was present when it was handed over.


    France's Le Pen says the EU 'will die', globalists to be defeatedBy Michaela Cabrera LILLE, France (Reuters) - The European Union will disappear, French presidential candidate Marine Le Pen told a rally on Sunday, promising to shield France from globalisation as she sought to fire up her supporters in the final four weeks before voting gets underway. Buoyed by the unexpected election of Donald Trump in the United States and by Britain's vote to leave the EU, the leader of the eurosceptic and anti-immigrant National Front (FN) party, told the rally in Lille that the French election would be the next step in what she called a global rebellion of the people. "The European Union will die because the people do not want it anymore ... arrogant and hegemonic empires are destined to perish," Le Pen said to loud cheers and applause.